Available Technologies

University of Cincinnati research has paved the way to numerous discoveries, that have gone on to create new fields and industries. From the development of the study of statistics, nuclear medicine, food sciences, gene editing, find your next blockbuster at UC.

UC's Office of Innovation can accommodate a range of licensing alternatives, including exclusive, non-exclusive, field of use and other limited licenses, depending on the circumstances and industry sector. UC’s primary objective in its technology transfer program is to benefit the public through rapid and effective commercialization of its useful research. UC negotiates all of its agreements with this objective in mind. UC will work with potential licensees to establish terms that are fair and appropriate for the technology and the particular industry sector.

NOTE: Clicking on the diagram below will take you to listing and search of available technologies.

 

Technologies List

Technical Field:

Imaging

Application:

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

ADVANTAGES

  • Improved detection sensitivity
  • Better trade-off between spatial resolution and scan time

Description:

Brain metastases are cancer cells that have spread to the brain from tumors in other organs in the body. Metastatic tumors are among the most common mass lesions in the brain. An estimated 24-45% of all cancer patients in the United States have brain metastases. Unfortunately, these brain metastases are often too small to be found early, and the tumors aren't identified until they have become quite advanced. Thus, the patient outcome at this late stage is very poor with a median survival rate of only three months.

Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) is considered the gold standard technique for brain metastases detection. Higher imaging resolution leads to better detection sensitivity. However, the contrast agent utilized for CE-MRI accumulates in only larger tumors. This creates a need to develop and optimize clinical MRI techniques and image post-processing techniques for early detection, diagnosis, and therapy evaluation of brain metastases. Dr. Jinghua Wang, Assistant Professor of Radiology at the University of Cincinnati and Chief MRI Scientist has developed a method to optimize MRI sequences that improves both image quality and acquisition efficiency.

Please contact Jill Uhl to discuss licensing this new technology:

Jill Uhl
Senior Licensing Associate
Jill.Uhl@UC.edu
513-558-5621

INVENTORS:
Dr. Jinghua Wang PhD - Assistant Professor - Radiology

Technical Field:

Research Tool

Application:

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

ADVANTAGES

  • Improved detection sensitivity
  • Better trade-off between spatial resolution and scan time

Description:

Brain metastases are cancer cells that have spread to the brain from tumors in other organs in the body. Metastatic tumors are among the most common mass lesions in the brain. An estimated 24-45% of all cancer patients in the United States have brain metastases. Unfortunately, these brain metastases are often too small to be found early, and the tumors aren't identified until they have become quite advanced. Thus, the patient outcome at this late stage is very poor with a median survival rate of only three months.

Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) is considered the gold standard technique for brain metastases detection. Higher imaging resolution leads to better detection sensitivity. However, the contrast agent utilized for CE-MRI accumulates in only larger tumors. This creates a need to develop and optimize clinical MRI techniques and image post-processing techniques for early detection, diagnosis, and therapy evaluation of brain metastases. Dr. Jinghua Wang, Assistant Professor of Radiology at the University of Cincinnati and Chief MRI Scientist has developed a method to optimize MRI sequences that improves both image quality and acquisition efficiency.

Please contact Jill Uhl to discuss licensing this new technology:

Jill Uhl
Senior Licensing Associate
Jill.Uhl@UC.edu
513-558-5621

INVENTORS:
Dr. Jinghua Wang PhD - Assistant Professor - Radiology

Technical Field:

Imaging

Application:

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

ADVANTAGES

  • Improved detection sensitivity
  • Better trade-off between spatial resolution and scan time

Description:

Brain metastases are cancer cells that have spread to the brain from tumors in other organs in the body. Metastatic tumors are among the most common mass lesions in the brain. An estimated 24-45% of all cancer patients in the United States have brain metastases. Unfortunately, these brain metastases are often too small to be found early, and the tumors aren't identified until they have become quite advanced. Thus, the patient outcome at this late stage is very poor with a median survival rate of only three months.

Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) is considered the gold standard technique for brain metastases detection. Higher imaging resolution leads to better detection sensitivity. However, the contrast agent utilized for CE-MRI accumulates in only larger tumors. This creates a need to develop and optimize clinical MRI techniques and image post-processing techniques for early detection, diagnosis, and therapy evaluation of brain metastases. Dr. Jinghua Wang, Assistant Professor of Radiology at the University of Cincinnati and Chief MRI Scientist has developed a method to optimize MRI sequences that improves both image quality and acquisition efficiency.

Please contact Jill Uhl to discuss licensing this new technology:

Jill Uhl
Senior Licensing Associate
Jill.Uhl@UC.edu
513-558-5621

INVENTORS:
Dr. Jinghua Wang PhD - Assistant Professor - Radiology

Technical Field:

Hearing Restoration /Audiology / Otolaryngology / Neurotology / Skull Base Surgery

Application:

Cholesteatomas

ADVANTAGES

  • Minimizes spread and recurrence of cholesteatomas
  • Reduces complications after surgery
  • May reduce hearing loss
  • Reduction in healthcare costs

Description:

Tracheal pathologies such as narrowing (stenosis), malignancy (cancer), trauma, and congenital anatomical abnormalities require timely repair of the affected tissue to ensure survival. When reconstruction is needed for more than 1/3 of the airway, transplantation is the only clinical option. Unfortunately, finding donor tracheas with the proper dimensions oftentimes takes too long for the emergent patients. Recently some success has been shown while using decellularized tracheas (of which a stock of sizes can be kept in storage) or synthetic stents. However, decellularized tracheas often lack mechanical strength needed to withstand in vivo plural forces.1 Furthermore, synthetics, while biodegradable, are not bio-active, do not integrate well with surrounding tissue, and are too rigid to allow normal tracheal movement such as elongation and contraction. These issues create the need for a tissue engineered solution for long-segment tracheal reconstruction which is customizable for the patient's anatomy while maintaining bioactivity and replicating the native trachea strength and flexibility.Currently, no drug is available to cure CHST.

Dr. James Lin, professor in Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Cincinnati and his team have developed a method and device that replicates tracheal mechanical properties while allowing patient specificity. With this solution, surgical centers could keep lower stocks of decellularized tracheal tissue while serving a wider range of cases. Cell and animal studies have shown successful implementation of these methods. The technology could also be implemented to repair other tubular pathologies.

Please contact Jonathan Tyler to discuss licensing this new technology:

Jonathan Tyler
Licensing AssociateJonathan.
Tyler@UC.edu
513-558-3098

INVENTORS:
James Lin, PhDProfessor
Orthopaedic Surgery
University of Cincinnati

Stacey Gruber
Graduate Student
Biomedial Engineering
University of Cincinnati

Technical Field:

Diagnostics

Application:

Cholesteatomas

ADVANTAGES

  • Minimizes spread and recurrence of cholesteatomas
  • Reduces complications after surgery
  • May reduce hearing loss
  • Reduction in healthcare costs

Description:

The number of people diagnosed with liver disease was 4.9 million in 2016 with 40,326 dying from this disease in the US. Liver disease can be either inherited or caused by a variety of factors that can cause damage to the liver such as viruses, alcohol use, and obesity. In the early stage of any liver disease, liver may become inflamed. However, an inflamed liver may cause no discomfort at all, therefore this initial stage is not typically felt until the disease progresses further. Unfortunately, when left untreated, scar tissue starts to form which displaces healthy tissue. As the scar tissue builds, the liver can no longer function as needed.

Current liver function tests measure a host of specific proteins, enzymes, and substances. However, an abnormal test result is inconclusive for liver disease, as elevated levels could indicate other issues and diseases. Therefore, additional testing such as imaging or a liver biopsy is needed to determine the exact cause of these elevated test results.

Dr. Vladimir Bogdanov, Associate Professor of Internal Medicine at University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and Director of Hemostasis Research Program, and his team have developed a novel scoring system based on 7 different plasma parameters including alternatively spliced tissue factor to assess liver disease severity with high accuracy.

Please contact Tais Doll to discuss licensing this new technology:

Tais Doll, PhD
Licensing Associate
Tais.Doll@UC.edu
513-556-4546 

INVENTORS:
Vladimir Bogdanov, PhD
Associate Professor
Internal Medicine

Clayton Lewis, PhD
Postdoctoral Fellow
Internal Medicine

Patrick Van Dreden, PhD
Diagnostica Stago, Inc.

Technical Field:

Neurosurgery

Application:

Pathologies of the craniocervical junction

ADVANTAGES

  • Reduces OR time, blood loss and post-operative pain
  • Minimally invasive access and faster recovery associated with technique
  • Eliminates staged approach following odontoidectomy
  • Reduction in healthcare costs

Description:

Conditions in which the odontoid ventrally compresses the brainstem or spinal cord such as in trauma, rheumatoid arthritis pannus formation, basilar invagination and Chiari 1 malformation often present as lower cranial neuropathies, sensorimotor deficits and/or myelopathy necessitating decompression and subsequent stabilization and fusion. Following endonasal odontoidectomy, it is common for patients to require arthrodesis across O-C1 and C1-2. Traditionally, arthrodesis across O-C1 and C1-2 has been performed with posterior instrumentation and fusion as a second stage. Recent cadaveric feasibility studies have described endoscopic endonasal methods for C1-2 fixation. To date, however, no validated method for endonasal O-C1 exists.

A multidisciplinary team of scientists from the University of Cincinnati and the Weill Cornell Brain and Spine Center have developed an endonasal method for occipitocervical fusion of the O-C1 with a 3-D printed implant. Cadaveric studies assessing the feasibility of this method of instrumentation have been performed. Biomechanical testing is ongoing. This technique of atlanto-occipital fixation and fusion has the potential to eliminate a staged approach following odontoidectomy allowing stabilization to be performed from the initial endonasal approach.

Please contact Tais Doll to discuss licensing this new technology:

Tais Doll, PhD
Licensing Associate
Tais.Doll@UC.edu
513-556-4546 

INVENTORS:

Bryan Krueger, MD
University of Cincinnati
Neurosurgery

Justin Gibson, MD 
University of Cincinnati
Neurosurgery

Owen Yager
University of Cincinnati 
Biomedical Engineering

Technical Field:

Electromagnetics

Application:

Wound healing; Diabetic

ADVANTAGES

  • Accelerates wound healing
  • Doesn’t have to be in contact with patient or patient's skin
  • Minimal charging needed for the device. 

Description:

In the United States, the occurrence of diabetes is on the rise. Major complications of diabetes include diabetic ulcers and amputation of the lower extremities. Diabetic ulcers precede the vast majority of diabetic amputations. Diabetic ulcers are thought to proceed due to micro and macro vascular complications that result in hypoxia and compromise the natural wound healing processes of the tissues in the affected limbs. As a result, the natural wound healing processes are unable to repair damaged tissue in ulcerative diabetic patients. Diabetic ulcers are an example of chronic wounds and hypoxia induced wounds. Treatments for diabetic ulcers, chronic wounds, and hypoxia induced wounds are needed.

Currently available treatments for chronic wounds that are the result of hypoxia and/or compromised wound healing processes typically include the use of therapies that attempt to replace the extracellular matrix in the wound to provide scaffolding on which healing can occur. Currently therapies typically employ advanced moist wound therapy techniques, control of infection, bioengineered tissue or skin substitutes, growth factors, and negative pressure therapy. However, each of these therapies has drawbacks that limit their use.

With over 11 billion spent on devices in 2016 to help with the monitoring and controlling diabetic complications it is easy to see there is a need for incresing diabetic wound healing.

Dr. Daria Narmoneva, professor in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Cincinnati and her team have developed a device that has shown very positive data in diabetic pig wound healing and regeneration.

Please contact Jonathan Tyler to discuss licensing this new technology:

Jonathan Tyler
Licensing Associate
Jonathan.Tyler@UC.edu
513-558-3098

INVENTORS:
Daria A Narmoneva, PhD
Associate Professor
Biomedical Engineering

Andrei Kogan
Abdul Sheikh
Toloo Taghian

Technical Field:

Biomedical

Application:

Visual magnesium implant degradation monitor

ADVANTAGES

  • Passive Monitoring
  • Ultra-sensitive magnesium degradation sensing
  • Visual notification of magnesium degradation

Description:

Since its discovery in 1895, the radiograph has been a useful tool in medical procedures and health monitoring, giving physicians a non-invasive look into the body that they previously lacked.

In more recent years, magnesium has gained attention for bone repair as it has the strength to stabilize the bone during healing, similar to stainless steel, but then gradually dissolves when no longer needed. This avoids subsequent surgeries to remove the implant if complications arise. Because the densities of bone and magnesium are similar the implant does not show up clearly on X-rays or CT scans for monitoring the dissolution process.

Dr. William Heineman, PhD Professor in the College of Chemistry and his team have developed a novel solution to aid physicians who want to monitor the dissolution of these new magnesium derived implants via a non-invasive film that can be placed on the skin.

Please contact Jonathan Tyler to discuss licensing this new technology:

Jonathan Tyler
Licensing Associate
Jonathan.Tyler@UC.edu
513-558-3098 

INVENTORS:
William R. Heineman, PhD, Professor
Julia Kuhlmann, PhD
John A. Lynch PhD
Daniel Rose, PhD

Technical Field:

Biomedical Engineering

Application:

Toxicology Protocol

ADVANTAGES

  • Simplification of toxicology management
  • Strong and predictable documentation during auditing

Description:

Since its discovery in 1895, the radiograph has been a useful tool in medical procedures and health monitoring, giving physicians a non-invasive look into the body that they previously lacked.

In more recent years, magnesium has gained attention for bone repair as it has the strength to stabilize the bone during healing, similar to stainless steel, but then gradually dissolves when no longer needed. This avoids subsequent surgeries to remove the implant if complications arise. Because the densities of bone and magnesium are similar the implant does not show up clearly on X-rays or CT scans for monitoring the dissolution process.

Dr. William Heineman, PhD Professor in the College of Chemistry and his team have developed a novel solution to aid physicians who want to monitor the dissolution of these new magnesium derived implants via a non-invasive film that can be placed on the skin.

Please contact Jonathan Tyler to discuss licensing this new technology:

Jonathan Tyler
Licensing Associate
Jonathan.Tyler@UC.edu
513-558-3098 

INVENTORS:
William R. Heineman, PhD, Professor
Julia Kuhlmann, PhD
John A. Lynch PhD
Daniel Rose, PhD

Technical Field:

Biomedical Engineering

Application:

Tracheal Reconstruction

ADVANTAGES

  • Customization of donor tracheal material for patient needs/sizes
  • Incorporation of extracellular matrix proteins to cue progenitors
  • Constructs maintain strength while allowing flexibility of the graft
  • Smaller donor stocks create cost reduction

Description:

In vivo testing (animal testing) is useful in early-on biological development in order to assess the efficacy of the drug to meet its target specifications. These early toxicity studies are conducted using animal models in order to establish a toxicity profile that can later be used to calibrate in vitro (non-animal) toxicity assays. Due to this testing the animals may contaminate their bedding during the in vivo testing process, which can also threaten the health and safety of workers who come in contact or are exposed to the animal bedding.

Information regarding the level of contamination needs to be known, so workers can determine the appropriate level of risk management that needs to take place. Most often this is completed with paper and pen documentation that later gets filed. These systems can break down during audits whichh then lead to additional work, new and challenging processes, and, financial restrictions.

Dr. Jan Utrecht , Ph.D., Director of Environmental Health & Safety at the University of Cincinnati and his team has developed a program to monitor and predict toxicity levels that stands up against auditing and prevent the major disadvantages of the paper and pen system.


Please contact Jonathan Tyler to discuss licensing this new technology:

Jonathan Tyler
Licensing Associate
Jonathan.Tyler@UC.edu
513-558-3098 

INVENTORS:
James Lin, PhD

Professor
Orthopaedic Surgery
University of Cincinnati

Stacey GrGraduate Student
Biomedial Engineering

University of CincinnatiJerald Ovesen, PhD,
Research Environmental Health

We have a technology in a wide variety of areas. Please visit for a complete list of available technologies for liciencing.